SHOWCASE: The Long and Faraway Gone by Lou Berney


Posted by Ryder Islington, author of Ultimate Jutice, a Trey Fontaine Mystery, and coming at the end of March, Ultimate Game, a Trey Fontaine Mystery

The Long and Faraway Gone

by Lou Berney

on Tour March 2015

Book Details:

Genre: Mystery & Detective

Published by: William Morrow Paperbacks

Publication Date: 02/10/2015

Number of Pages: 464

ISBN: 9780062292438

Purchase Links:

 

Synopsis:

With the compelling narrative tension and psychological complexity of the works of Laura Lippman, Dennis Lehane, Kate Atkinson, and Michael Connelly, Edgar Award-nominee Lou Berney’s The Long and Faraway Gone is a smart, fiercely compassionate crime story that explores the mysteries of memory and the impact of violence on survivors—and the lengths they will go to find the painful truth of the events that scarred their lives.

In the summer of 1986, two tragedies rocked Oklahoma City. Six movie-theater employees were killed in an armed robbery, while one inexplicably survived. Then, a teenage girl vanished from the annual State Fair. Neither crime was ever solved.

Twenty-five years later, the reverberations of those unsolved cases quietly echo through survivors’ lives. A private investigator in Vegas, Wyatt’s latest inquiry takes him back to a past he’s tried to escape—and drags him deeper into the harrowing mystery of the movie house robbery that left six of his friends dead.

Like Wyatt, Julianna struggles with the past—with the day her beautiful older sister Genevieve disappeared. When Julianna discovers that one of the original suspects has resurfaced, she’ll stop at nothing to find answers.

As fate brings these damaged souls together, their obsessive quests spark sexual currents neither can resist. But will their shared passion and obsession heal them, or push them closer to the edge? Even if they find the truth, will it help them understand what happened, that long and faraway gone summer? Will it set them free—or ultimately destroy them?

 

Read an excerpt:

But Wyatt had already told Gavin that he’d do the favor for him.

If he tried to back out now, Gavin would want to know why.

Wyatt ran through the lies he could tell. He knew that Gavin would buy none of them.

Wyatt’s mouth tasted stale from the coffee he’d had with breakfast, so he scooped water from the faucet and rinsed his mouth.

He returned to his desk and sat back down.

“So a guy from Omaha goes on a business trip to New York City,” he said. “The guy he’s meeting takes him out to dinner. They have a couple of steaks. Amazing steaks. Prime porterhouses,
dry-aged. But expensive—this is New York City after all.”

Gavin finished writing a check and tore it out of the book.

“This is for a week, double your rate plus expenses. Don’t say you never did nothing for me.”

“The guy from Omaha says, ‘You know, if we were in Omaha right now, these steaks would only cost ten bucks.’ The guy from New York City just looks at him and says, ‘Yeah, but we’d be in
Omaha.’ ”

“That’s why you’re going, not me.” Gavin stood. “Oklahoma. Shit. What’s in Oklahoma? The wind sweeping down the plains. Have a nice trip.”

 

Author Bio:

Lou Berney is the author of two previous novels—Whiplash River, nominated for an Edgar Award, and Gutshot Straight, nominated for a Barry Award-as well as the collection The Road to Bobby Joe and Other Stories. A television and film screenwriter, he also teaches writing at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma City University.

Catch Up:

 

Tour Participants:

 

1. 3/01 Showcase @ Our Wolves Den
2. 3/02 Guest Post @ The Book Divas Reads
3. 3/04 Showcase @ Mommabears Book Blog?
4. 3/10 Review & Interview @ Keenly Kristin?
5. 3/11 Review @ Its a Mad Mad World
6. 3/14 Interview @ Hott Books
7. 3/24 Interview @ Writers and Authors
8. 3/24 Review @ Tea and A Book
9. 3/25 Showcase @ Ryder Islingtons Blog
10. 3/26 Review @ Luxury Reading

 

Get More Great Reads at Partners In Crime Virtual Book Tours

 

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GUEST POST: How Your Personal History Affects Your Writing by Richard H. Hardy, Author of The Infinity Program


Posted by Ryder Islington, Author of ULTIMATE JUSTICE, A Trey Fontaine Mystery

I had the honor of allowing Richard H. Hardy to present a guest post and also, to introduce himself and his book, The Infinity, to my wonderful followers and readers. Below is his post on How Your Personal History Affects Your Writing, followed by a Bio, Excerpt of the book, Book Summary, and ways to contact Mr. Hardy, and purchase The Infinity Program.

I love to support authors, and am pleased to have Richard here to share his history, knowledge, skill and of course, his book.

 

How Your Personal History Affects Your Writing

My family came to the U.S when I was four years old.  My father was a Chartered Accountant (the British equivalent of a CPA) and he thought he’d have better career opportunities in the USA.  For me, it was a great adventure.  I can even remember seeing the Statue of Liberty when we arrived at New York.

My first great discovery in America was the comic book, especially Superman and Captain Marvel.  Super powers, spaceships, time machines, other worlds—I was just blown away.  To this day I can remember whole panels from these ancient comic books.  I used to pretend that I had come from to America from Krypton.  When other kids were playing in a sand box, I was dreaming about rocket ships to other worlds.

When I was about thirteen years old I bought a bushel basket filled with Astounding Science Fiction magazines from the 1940s.  These timeless classics included writers like Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov, L. Sprague Decamp and A.E. Van Vogt.  Van Vogt in particular made a huge impression on me with his Worlds of Nul-A.  The world of non-Aristotelian logic and General Semantics was pretty heady stuff to wrap my mind around.  I was completely hooked by imaginative worlds of Science Fiction.  At first it made me want to be a scientist.  I began to devour non-fiction books about Relativity Theory and Quantum Mechanics.

When I got older I discovered that there was more to literature than just Science Fiction.  Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and Ape and Essence led me to Antic Hay and Chrome Yellow, Huxley’s satires about English life in the 1920s.  From there it was on to authors like Thomas Wolfe and James Joyce.  Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man was a revelation to me.

The father of one of my college girl friends once said to me, “I never thought I would ever say this to anyone, Richard, but I think you read too much.”  I did and I still do.  Books are one of the great passions in my life.  Put me in a library and I am like an alcoholic in a brewery!  It is this long experience with books that led me to be a writer.  There’s nothing quite like a well made book in your hand.  Nothing can come close to it except 30 or 40 pages of your own work, fresh off the printer.  A love of books and a love of writing go together.  I was very fortunate to grow up in a home that valued both.

 

richard Richard H. Hardy’s Bio:

Richard H. Hardy was born in Glasgow, Scotland, during a week of relentless bombing raids just before the close of World War II. The day he was born an incendiary bomb fell on the church across the street from where he lived, so he is fond of saying that he entered the world with a big adrenaline rush.His family later moved to England and then on to America.After college Richard bounced through a series of temporary jobs as he traveled around the country, wanting nothing more than to write fiction. A job driving a library van allowed him free time to write several short stories and work on a novel.He and his wife moved to New Hampshire, where he took an entry level job at a software company. He was soon promoted to the technical writing department and ended up producing over 500,000 words of online documentation. After a few years he was promoted to the programming department and ended up as the Senior EDI Programmer, creating EDI maps and writing UNIX scripts and troubleshooting on AIX systems throughout the U.S. and Canada.

After he retired, he started writing fiction again. The Infinity Program is his first published novel.

 200 The Infinity Program Summary
Jon Graeme and Harry Sale are unlikely friends. Harry is a world-class programmer, but his abrasive personality alienates co-workers. In contrast, Jon is a handsome and easy-going technical writer, the low man on the IT totem pole.Sharing a love of nature, the men set out together, planning to go their separate ways–Jon on a hike and Harry, fly fishing. Three days later, Jon arrives at the rendezvous point, but his friend is nowhere in sight. When Jon finds Harry unconscious on the floor of a cave, Harry claims to have been lying there the entire time. But he is neither cold nor hungry. What Jon doesn’t know is that Harry fell into an underground cavern, where he came into contact with an alien quantum computer.Back at work, Harry jettisons his regular tasks and concentrates exclusively on inventing new operating language to access the alien system. In the process he crashes his office’s Super Computer and is fired. Jon convinces the company to give Harry a second chance, arguing that the system he has invented will make them millions.Jon has no idea what havoc Harry is about to unleash.

Formats/Prices: $5.95 ebook, $13.95 paperback
Genre: Science Fiction, Romance
Pages: 250
Release: April 1, 2014
Publisher: Camel Press
ISBN: 9781603819336

 

 

The Infinity Program GoodReads page:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20794011-the-infinity-program

Richard H. Hardy’s Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/richard.hardy.31924

Richard H. Hardy‘s Twitter:
https://twitter.com/rhfh944

Richard H. Hardy‘s GoodReads:
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7844267.Richard_H_Hardy

Richard H. Hardy’s blog:
http://richard-hardy.com/blog/

Richard H. Hardy’s website:
http://richard-hardy.com/

Tribute Books Blog Tours Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tribute-Books-Blog-Tours/242431245775186

The Infinity Program tour site:
http://theinfinityprogram.blogspot.com/

SHOWCASE: Cornered by Alan Brenham


Posted by Ryder Islington, Author of ULTIMATE JUSTICE, A Trey Fontaine Mystery

Cornered

by Alan Brenham

on Tour September 2014

Cornered by Alan Brenham

Book Details:

Genre: Mystery/Thriller

Published by: Black Opal Books

Publication Date: July 19, 2014

Number of Pages: 320

ISBN: 9781626941380/9781626941373

Purchase Links:

 

Synopsis:

He’s haunted by the memory of a kidnapping case gone wrong…

Not wanting history to repeat itself, Detective Matt Brady struggles to solve the disappearances of seven young women, but he quickly finds himself pitted against a criminal organization that knows as much about police procedure as he does—an organization that will do whatever it takes to stay one step ahead of him. His troubles are compounded when a young veterinarian injects herself into the investigation and is targeted to become victim number eight. When he tries to protect her, he finds himself in the crosshairs of a professional cop killer. Can Brady solve the case in time to save his new love, or will this investigation be the death of both of them?

 

Kudos:

“Alan Brenham’s Cornered is a taunt thriller filled with murderous twists and turns that will satisfy readers who love good crime fiction. As a cop and a lawyer, Brenham has been there and done that and in this, his second outing, the authenticity of his storytelling ability continues to shine through.”
– Michael McGarrity, New York Times Bestselling Author of Hard Country & Backlands

Read an excerpt:

Brady moved next to Killebrew. “So you find anything?”

“No prints. But we did find a nine millimeter shell casing outside.” He pointed at the door. “The witness said she used a key to open the door when Becker failed to answer the doorbell.”

Brady knelt down next to the body and peered at her head. One apparent gunshot wound above the right eye. Her half-opened dilated pupils stared straight up towards the ceiling.

Killebrew stepped close to the wall opposite the front door, pointing at a hole. Blood spatter was on the lower half of the wall. “We removed the bullet from here. The round appears to be a nine millimeter. Same as the shell casing.”

He stood up and surveyed the living room. The front window was covered with flowery-patterned drapes. A piano sat in the far corner by the front window. He was no expert on furniture but the furniture appeared to be fairly expensive pieces. He saw some mail lying on the coffee table. Using a pen, he sifted through it, checking the sender’s address, but nothing jumped out at him. A family portrait of her, an ordinary-looking man with narrow shoulders he assumed was Burt Smith, and twins—a girl and a boy—sat on the end of the table.

 

Author Bio:

Alan Behr served as a law enforcement officer and criminal investigator for seventeen years before earning a law degree from Baylor University. After obtaining his law license, he worked as a prosecutor and criminal defense attorney for twenty-two years. His personal and official travels took him to several European and Middle Eastern countries, Alaska and almost every island in the Caribbean. He has lived in Berlin, Germany while working with US military forces. After retiring from government service, he has authored two crime novels – Price of Justice and Cornered – under the pen name of Alan Brenham. He is presently working on two more novels. Alan and his wife, Lillian, currently live in the Austin, Texas area.

 

Tour Participants:

1.  9/01 Review @ Buried Under Books

Giveaway:

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The Common Cold And The Creative Brain.


Posted by Ryder Islington, Author of ULTIMATE JUSTICE, A Trey Fontaine Mystery

Maybe the title should be more specific–based on This Creative Brain. I hate getting a cold, and in fact don’t think I’ve had even a sniffle in the last ten years. Until last week.

At the most inconvenient time, when I’m in the beginning stages of revision with my wonderful, and patient, editor, I was knocked for a loop by a virus that had me sneezing and hacking, unable to sleep, with a fever, a sore throat, and a bad attitude.

The first couple of days I couldn’t concentrate on anything. My brain was just too busy sending out warriors to fight the virus. It didn’t have time for creativity. In fact, it didn’t have time for understanding simple English. I said, “Huh?” to anyone who spoke.

By day three the fever was lower, and I was able to function on a simple level, but trying to revise the story and get it back to the editor just couldn’t happen. By Sunday, the fever and headache were gone, and my throat was only sore from a raspy cough. I began with page one of the revision, reading the editor’s comments, trying to make sense of what she wanted. The easiest fixes were manageable, but I still couldn’t create new content.

It’s Monday night. My sinuses are still not up to par, and I cough so hard on occasion that I think my lungs are coming up, but my brain is at least able to create. Now, if I could just understand what  it is the editor wants me to create!

We all know that even a simple virus affects many of our abilities. We know the body and brain will ignore things that aren’t vital to survival while fighting off invaders. But I never realized how profoundly my thinking is altered by a simple cold.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to send an email to the editor and see if she can explain her comments to me, like I was a two year old.

GUEST POST: The 7 Ways to Become a Better Writer by Valerie Thomas


I met a charming up-and-comer last week and wanted to allow her the floor for a guest post. Enjoy the thoughts of Valerie Thomas.

The 7 Ways to Become a Better Writer

Please note, the ordering of this list is not random. There is a definite progression from the activities I find help me most with my writing, to the ones that help the least. With that in mind—and the caveat that this is only the opinion of one starving author (okay, well maybe not starving)—please enjoy.

  1. This is the most obvious one, so don’t neglect it. There isn’t any wax-on, wax-off for writing; you just do it (kudos if you recognize the reference).
  2. Read books in your genre. This is almost as important as writing. As Orson Scott Card argues in his book How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy, the only way to gain familiarity with the clichés and nuances of your genre is to read as many related novels as you can get your hands on.
  3. Get critiques, whenever and wherever you can. Critiques from peers, not friends or family, are key. It’s easy to think a work is good when no one else has read it, or to think a piece is so perfect it wouldn’t bear any more editing—but trust me, critiquers will find problems and places to edit for you. Please note that you shouldn’t simply accept critiques as fact, however; consider the advice for yourself, decide whether it makes sense to you.
  4. Read nonfiction, and books outside your genre. My favorite nonfiction books are those on the topic of becoming a better writer, but at the very least a writer should be familiar with the names Strunk and White, and read a few books outside their comfort zone every year. The reason being, romance novels occasionally need an action scene, mysteries sometimes require romance, and science fiction often pulls from every other genre. Instead of emulating scenes written by authors whose skill lies elsewhere, the best answer is to go straight to the source.
  5. Go on an adventure.Writing becomes much easier if you base things, as much as you can, on your own life and experiences (this is why Ender’s Game is set in North Carolina and Pretty Little Liars is set in Pennsylvania). If you have some interesting memories to put down on paper, your novel ideas will be interesting as well. So go out and get some.
  6. Develop your empathy. Believable characters come from authors who understand people, and empathy is our way to reach an understanding. If you want somewhere to start, Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People is one of the best books I’ve read.
  7. Work on your spatial awareness. There are some successful authors who can’t picture their own scenes, but to my knowledge they are very few. In order to recreate a scene in the reader’s head, an author must first be able to picture it themselves, which is why a developed spatial mind is important.

Please note that television and movie-watching are nowhere on this list. I suppose, if they were, I might place them at a very distant eight. I personally enjoy both forms of media, but have yet to notice any credible improvement in my writing from watching The Big Bang Theory.

Do you think this list is incomplete, or that I got the ordering wrong? Do you have a good book or relevant source to recommend? Please let me know in the comments below.

 

Valerie Thomas is a twenty year old college student in Colorado and author of The Clique. Her blog can be found at valeriethomasblog.wordpress.com” Something like that should be perfect.

What Do You Think of Multi-Genre Authors?


Like many authors, I have ideas for books in different genres. My first two books are mysteries, but the real point of them is the psychological motives behind the actions of the characters. I like delving into the mind, asking why. I like writing about real people, facing real problems, and reacting as individuals.

I’m working on a literary novel, one that may become a series. The basis of it is the way people raised in the same household can turn out so different. They think differently, have different motives, etc. I’d love to be able to write such a book, and promote it right here, on this blog, which has so far only promoted my mystery books.

Of course, I do promote all kinds of books on this site, mystery, thriller, time-travel, fantasy, historical, romance, etc. But I’m wondering how my followers would feel about me promoting my own writing in different genres on this site. I’d love to hear from you. How do you feel about this subject? Would you rather not read about my exploits in different genres on this site? Or do you feel that as long as I stick with the psychological drama of life, it would still fit with your interests?