REVIEW: How To Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon by Penny C. Sansevieri


Posted by Ryder Islington, author of Ultimate Justice, a Trey Fontaine Mystery

Authors know that books don’t sell themselves. We no longer live a a world where writers get to just write, while all other aspects of the writing business is handled by publishers and agents. Now, if want your book to sell, you have to sell it. How To Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon is the perfect book for those of us who have written a book and need to increase our sales. It doesn’t matter if you’re an old pro or a newbie, this book is a great asset for writers.

Ms. Sansevieri explains how Amazon works, how to research key words, Amazon Author Central, free promotions, how to find top Amazon reviewers, and much, much more. And the real key is, even an old fogie like me can understand what she’s saying!

This book is going on my reference shelf with those keepers that I rely on regularly for writing, publishing, and promoting. A great book for wannabes and pros.

Below you can see the cover, read a book description and an author bio, find out where to get the book, and find other reviews, as well as interviews of the author and posts by her. And don’t forget to put your name in the hat for a chance to win a free copy of How To Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon  by Penny C. Sansevieri.

How to Sell Books by the Truckload on Amazon Power Pack2

Book Description:

Amazon wants you to sell a lot of books. And How to Sell Your Books by the Truckload teaches you exactly how to do it. Internationally renowned Amazon book marketing expert, Penny Sansevieri, has created the ultimate guide for mastering the Amazon marketing system.

And in moments it can be right at your fingertips! The savings in time you’ll gain is enormous—when compared to painstakingly researching this information yourself.

When you follow Penny’s time-tested proven formulas you’ll instantly skyrocket the exposure you receive and kick your book promotion campaign into overdrive!

Plus, you can bypass all of the misinformation out there about how Amazon works. That’s because every secret you need to know to understand the Amazon marketing system inside and out is right here. Penny Sanseveri takes you step-by-step through simple and dynamic processes that show you how to:

  • Get top visibility for your book on Amazon
  • Increase sales through perfectly-timed pre-order campaigns
  • Leverage a secret tool to get hundreds of reader reviews
  • Use Kindle Unlimited to your greatest advantage
  • Boost sales by knowing when to give away your e-book – it really works!
  • Use keywords and book descriptions that puts your book in front of tons of buyers
  • Identify and locate secret categories that drive bigger sales

Get your booked ranked #1 in your category!

Penny C. Sansevieri

Author’s Bio:

Penny C. Sansevieri, Founder and CEO Author Marketing Experts, Inc., is a best-selling author and internationally recognized book marketing and media relations expert. She is an Adjunct Professor teaching Self-Publishing for NYU.

Her company is one of the leaders in the publishing industry and has developed some of the most innovative Social Media/Internet book marketing campaigns. She is the author of fourteen books, including How to Sell Your Books by the Truckload on Amazon and Red Hot Internet Publicity, which has been called the “leading guide to everything Internet.”

AME was the first book marketing and publicity firm to use Internet promotion to its full impact through The Virtual Author Tour™, which strategically harnesses social networking sites, Twitter, blogs, book videos, and relevant sites in order to push an author’s message into the online community. AME has had over eleven books top bestseller lists, including those of the New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal.

To learn more about Penny’s books or her promotional services, you can visit her web site at www.amarketingexpert.com.

Connect with Penny:  Facebook  ~  Twitter  ~  Pinterest   Google +

Where to buy the book:

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REBLOG: How To Write A Fight Scene


In my desire to write fight scenes that were believable, I went searching on the net for an authority. I found one. This is a great article on writing fight scenes that I thought might help other writers. Form WRITEWORLD, here is How To Write A Fight Scene:

 

Admin Note: This post is a rebloggable copy of our page on fight scenes. The page is being phased out, so from now on all updates will be made on this post and not on the page.

Among the typically difficult scenes writers face in their stories, the fight scene definitely ranks high on the list. Below you will find several resources with tips for writing a good fight scene.

Action with a Side of Zombies: One of our articles focused specifically on writing action scenes. Bonus: the examples all include zombies.
ArchetypesAndAllusions: An article on the three main types of fighters and their various approaches to kickin’ ass (or not).
TheCreativePenn.com: Alan Baxter, speculative fiction author, gives some great advice on characterization, setting, martial style, and cliches.
StoryHack.com: A PDF that takes you through writing a fight scene step by step by Randy Ingermanson, compiled by Bryce Beattie.
MarilynnByerly.com: An extremely good guide to writing fight scenes. This guide includes tips on character viewpoint, mapping the fight, and tricks for writing each type of fight.
Shelfari.com: This site is an interview with famed fantasy author R.A. Salvatore on how to write great fight scenes.
TheBusinessOfWriting: C. Patrick Schulze gives some good, solid advice on identifying and writing your fight scene.
EzineArticles.com: Marq McAlister explains how to make a fight scene pack some serious punch. This article is good for fine-tuning.
Martin Turner: Focusing specifically on sword-fighting scenes, Martin Turner writes in great detail on every conceivable detail of this type of time-honored fight scene.
SeriousPixie.com: Susan tells you about the three types of fight scene writers and explains how to fix the problems that arise for each type.
David Alan Lucus: This multi-part guide gives advice in exhaustive detail on how to write an awesome fight scene.
NightFoot: This Tumblr post offers some great tips for writing fight scenes.
Film Crit Hulk: A shoe-in for screenwriters, the Hulk and special guest Tom Townend talk shop on how to write a great movie action scene.
Harry Edmundson-Cornell: Harry writes a series on the fight scene geared toward writers of Superhero comics.
How To Fight Write: The knowledgeable and thorough admins of this exceptional Tumblr blog will teach you everything you ever wanted to know about fight scenes and weaponry—even if they have to beat it into you.
Scholagladiatoria: A YouTuber with lots of weapons teaches you how they were/are properly used to their greatest advantage.
These links provide advice specifically for writing battle scenes:

Gerri Blanc: eHow’s article on battle scenes is a basic step-by-step list for you. It’s a good introduction to writing battle scenes.
StormTheCastle.com: This article takes you through an in-depth guide on how to write battle scenes for fantasy stories.
Rhonda Leigh Jones: Jones lists some dos and don’ts of writing battle scenes.
Other resources:

List of Martial Arts: Looking for a fighting style? Find it here!
List of Weapons: Every type of weapon you can think of is listed here.
List of Military Tactics: From troop movements to siege warfare, this list has got you covered.
Asylum.com: A few examples of awesome battle tactics from history.
BadassOfTheWeek.com: Get some inspiration for awesome fight scenes and fighting characters from this compendium of badassitude.
Thearmedgentleman: Austin has offered to share his knowledge on weaponry with any writers who have questions. Thanks, Austin!
Don’t see what you’re looking for here? You can find every post we’ve ever made or reblogged about fight scenes in our “fight” tag. You might also find our “action scene” tag useful.

We hope this helps! If you have another link or a tip for how to write fight/battle scenes, hit up our ask box and let us know!

REBLOG – 1 YEAR AGO WITH 11,934 NOTES
#FIGHT #FIGHT SCENE #RESOURCES #WRITING TIPS #WRITING #THEARMEDGENTLEMAN

You can find other great articles about writing at WriteWorld.tumblr.com

GUEST POST: The 7 Ways to Become a Better Writer by Valerie Thomas


I met a charming up-and-comer last week and wanted to allow her the floor for a guest post. Enjoy the thoughts of Valerie Thomas.

The 7 Ways to Become a Better Writer

Please note, the ordering of this list is not random. There is a definite progression from the activities I find help me most with my writing, to the ones that help the least. With that in mind—and the caveat that this is only the opinion of one starving author (okay, well maybe not starving)—please enjoy.

  1. This is the most obvious one, so don’t neglect it. There isn’t any wax-on, wax-off for writing; you just do it (kudos if you recognize the reference).
  2. Read books in your genre. This is almost as important as writing. As Orson Scott Card argues in his book How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy, the only way to gain familiarity with the clichés and nuances of your genre is to read as many related novels as you can get your hands on.
  3. Get critiques, whenever and wherever you can. Critiques from peers, not friends or family, are key. It’s easy to think a work is good when no one else has read it, or to think a piece is so perfect it wouldn’t bear any more editing—but trust me, critiquers will find problems and places to edit for you. Please note that you shouldn’t simply accept critiques as fact, however; consider the advice for yourself, decide whether it makes sense to you.
  4. Read nonfiction, and books outside your genre. My favorite nonfiction books are those on the topic of becoming a better writer, but at the very least a writer should be familiar with the names Strunk and White, and read a few books outside their comfort zone every year. The reason being, romance novels occasionally need an action scene, mysteries sometimes require romance, and science fiction often pulls from every other genre. Instead of emulating scenes written by authors whose skill lies elsewhere, the best answer is to go straight to the source.
  5. Go on an adventure.Writing becomes much easier if you base things, as much as you can, on your own life and experiences (this is why Ender’s Game is set in North Carolina and Pretty Little Liars is set in Pennsylvania). If you have some interesting memories to put down on paper, your novel ideas will be interesting as well. So go out and get some.
  6. Develop your empathy. Believable characters come from authors who understand people, and empathy is our way to reach an understanding. If you want somewhere to start, Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People is one of the best books I’ve read.
  7. Work on your spatial awareness. There are some successful authors who can’t picture their own scenes, but to my knowledge they are very few. In order to recreate a scene in the reader’s head, an author must first be able to picture it themselves, which is why a developed spatial mind is important.

Please note that television and movie-watching are nowhere on this list. I suppose, if they were, I might place them at a very distant eight. I personally enjoy both forms of media, but have yet to notice any credible improvement in my writing from watching The Big Bang Theory.

Do you think this list is incomplete, or that I got the ordering wrong? Do you have a good book or relevant source to recommend? Please let me know in the comments below.

 

Valerie Thomas is a twenty year old college student in Colorado and author of The Clique. Her blog can be found at valeriethomasblog.wordpress.com” Something like that should be perfect.

I’m Baaaaack! At Least Temporarily


Hi to all those who visit my blog.
I appreciate your patience as I took a few weeks off for a major revision of ULTIMATE GAME, A Trey Fontaine Mystery. It’s now in the hands of beta readers, so I have time to breathe and check on my poor, ignored blog.
Next week I’ll use the comments from the beta readers to do a polish, and then the manuscript is off to the editor. I’m hoping I managed to make it into what she wanted.
If not, it will be stuck in a drawer for a while, until it’s cold enough so I can do a better edit.
Hope to get a review or two in after sending this to the editor.
In the meantime, I’m enjoying reading THE FIERY CROSS by Diana Gabaldon–this is the second time I’ve read it–and hope to read the rest of the series before I purchase the newest addition, WRITTEN IN MY OWN HEART’S BLOOD in June.
Has anyone out there read this series?

Are there authors following me who read my first book, ULTIMATE JUSTICE, A Trey Fontaine Mystery?
What are you guys reading now?

Before and After


The good news is, I submitted book two of the Trey Fontaine Mystery series to my publisher. The bad news is a major revision is in order. On the other hand, the good news is, I have a chance to fix the manuscript and make it much better, but the bad news is, I’ll have no time to read, or blog, or breathe, until it’s done.

Here’s some more good news: I judged five published books in the Daphe this year, and plan to review all of them on this blog after the big revision. And I’ve also read several other books this year, and plan to review them this spring/summer. So after my manuscript for ULTIMATE GAME, A Trey Fontaine Mystery is re-submitted, you’ll have the opportunity to read reviews of DEADLY INTERITANCE by Suzanne Rossi, DEEP IN MY HEART by Patricia W. Fischer, STOLEN by Allison Brennan, THE FALLEN ANGELS BOOK CLUB by R. Franklin James, BETRAYED by Donnell Ann Bell.

In the meantime, if you haven’t had a chance to read some of the past reviews and articles, you’ll find over two hundred options for a short read about books, writing, authors, classes, guest posts, interviews, promotions, and moi. I’ll be back.

Wooo Hooo I’m Through!


For those of you who don’t know, I’ve been on deadline, trying to get book two of The Trey Fontaine Mystery Series finished and sent to my publisher, which is why there have been no new posts for a while.

But, I’m baaaaack!

I’ve read several books over the last few months and will be posting reviews of those that I enjoyed. In case you don’t know this, I don’t give bad reviews. And I don’t lie. So when I read a book that I feel I can’t give a good review, I send a letter to the author or publisher letting her/him know that I read the book, found it lacking, and what I didn’t like, didn’t approve of, or felt was not interesting, or accurate, etc. I try to be fair and objective.

I’ve found that there are a lot of self-published books by authors who are superior writers with great stories to tell, but some of them don’t bother with an editor, and as a result, end up with a manuscript that is just an inferior product. Of course, there are books that are put out by major publishing houses that I have refused to review because the plot and/or characters were too flat, or there wasn’t enough tension, etc. But usually, they are well edited.

So, for all of you out there who are planning to self publish, please get an editor!

I’m grateful for all of you who have stuck with me through these dry spells, when my blog sits stagnant while I’m stuck in neutral, or off handling other things. There have even been new followers during the last few weeks, though I haven’t posted anything new. I do appreciate all of you.

I hope everyone enjoyed your holidays and that the New Year is going to be happy and prosperous for you!

The Dangers of Research


As an author, I’m always doing research. But research for my work in progress, ULTIMATE GAME, A Trey Fontaine Mystery, has made me take a second look at using my own computer for internet searches. I mean, really, how many people research how to make cocaine, and human trafficking, and cargo planes used by drug lords? I had to find answers like, how far is it from Jamaica to Columbia? How much land in Columbia is used to grow cocoa? How much does a kilo of pure cocaine cost? What is the best route for flying cocaine from Columbia to America? Through Canada?

Makes me wonder if I”m on a watch list or something. I mean, I’m just a normal person, but this book has pulled me into the nastier side of humanity. When I was finished researching the world of drug lords and following the creation of cocaine from the fields of South America to the American teen, I had to start on human trafficking, prostitution, etc. What would a madame pay for a string of young, beautiful American girls? Who else might they be sold to? An Arabian sheik? A Japanese businessman? What would they pay to have an American girl as a sex slave?

Well, at least I’ve finished the worst of the research. I’m now working on the names of streets in France, and how the maid of a drug lord in Colombia might answer the phone. And a few Spanish words. Much milder stuff. Stuff that shouldn’t draw so much attention to me.

Maybe I should change my name. Or do my deep research at a large library. Or find someone I really don’t like, make nice, and then use their computer! Hey, anyone out there want to do research for my next Trey Fontaine mystery? It’s about child molesters.