REBLOG: How To Write A Fight Scene


In my desire to write fight scenes that were believable, I went searching on the net for an authority. I found one. This is a great article on writing fight scenes that I thought might help other writers. Form WRITEWORLD, here is How To Write A Fight Scene:

 

Admin Note: This post is a rebloggable copy of our page on fight scenes. The page is being phased out, so from now on all updates will be made on this post and not on the page.

Among the typically difficult scenes writers face in their stories, the fight scene definitely ranks high on the list. Below you will find several resources with tips for writing a good fight scene.

Action with a Side of Zombies: One of our articles focused specifically on writing action scenes. Bonus: the examples all include zombies.
ArchetypesAndAllusions: An article on the three main types of fighters and their various approaches to kickin’ ass (or not).
TheCreativePenn.com: Alan Baxter, speculative fiction author, gives some great advice on characterization, setting, martial style, and cliches.
StoryHack.com: A PDF that takes you through writing a fight scene step by step by Randy Ingermanson, compiled by Bryce Beattie.
MarilynnByerly.com: An extremely good guide to writing fight scenes. This guide includes tips on character viewpoint, mapping the fight, and tricks for writing each type of fight.
Shelfari.com: This site is an interview with famed fantasy author R.A. Salvatore on how to write great fight scenes.
TheBusinessOfWriting: C. Patrick Schulze gives some good, solid advice on identifying and writing your fight scene.
EzineArticles.com: Marq McAlister explains how to make a fight scene pack some serious punch. This article is good for fine-tuning.
Martin Turner: Focusing specifically on sword-fighting scenes, Martin Turner writes in great detail on every conceivable detail of this type of time-honored fight scene.
SeriousPixie.com: Susan tells you about the three types of fight scene writers and explains how to fix the problems that arise for each type.
David Alan Lucus: This multi-part guide gives advice in exhaustive detail on how to write an awesome fight scene.
NightFoot: This Tumblr post offers some great tips for writing fight scenes.
Film Crit Hulk: A shoe-in for screenwriters, the Hulk and special guest Tom Townend talk shop on how to write a great movie action scene.
Harry Edmundson-Cornell: Harry writes a series on the fight scene geared toward writers of Superhero comics.
How To Fight Write: The knowledgeable and thorough admins of this exceptional Tumblr blog will teach you everything you ever wanted to know about fight scenes and weaponry—even if they have to beat it into you.
Scholagladiatoria: A YouTuber with lots of weapons teaches you how they were/are properly used to their greatest advantage.
These links provide advice specifically for writing battle scenes:

Gerri Blanc: eHow’s article on battle scenes is a basic step-by-step list for you. It’s a good introduction to writing battle scenes.
StormTheCastle.com: This article takes you through an in-depth guide on how to write battle scenes for fantasy stories.
Rhonda Leigh Jones: Jones lists some dos and don’ts of writing battle scenes.
Other resources:

List of Martial Arts: Looking for a fighting style? Find it here!
List of Weapons: Every type of weapon you can think of is listed here.
List of Military Tactics: From troop movements to siege warfare, this list has got you covered.
Asylum.com: A few examples of awesome battle tactics from history.
BadassOfTheWeek.com: Get some inspiration for awesome fight scenes and fighting characters from this compendium of badassitude.
Thearmedgentleman: Austin has offered to share his knowledge on weaponry with any writers who have questions. Thanks, Austin!
Don’t see what you’re looking for here? You can find every post we’ve ever made or reblogged about fight scenes in our “fight” tag. You might also find our “action scene” tag useful.

We hope this helps! If you have another link or a tip for how to write fight/battle scenes, hit up our ask box and let us know!

REBLOG – 1 YEAR AGO WITH 11,934 NOTES
#FIGHT #FIGHT SCENE #RESOURCES #WRITING TIPS #WRITING #THEARMEDGENTLEMAN

You can find other great articles about writing at WriteWorld.tumblr.com

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Before and After


The good news is, I submitted book two of the Trey Fontaine Mystery series to my publisher. The bad news is a major revision is in order. On the other hand, the good news is, I have a chance to fix the manuscript and make it much better, but the bad news is, I’ll have no time to read, or blog, or breathe, until it’s done.

Here’s some more good news: I judged five published books in the Daphe this year, and plan to review all of them on this blog after the big revision. And I’ve also read several other books this year, and plan to review them this spring/summer. So after my manuscript for ULTIMATE GAME, A Trey Fontaine Mystery is re-submitted, you’ll have the opportunity to read reviews of DEADLY INTERITANCE by Suzanne Rossi, DEEP IN MY HEART by Patricia W. Fischer, STOLEN by Allison Brennan, THE FALLEN ANGELS BOOK CLUB by R. Franklin James, BETRAYED by Donnell Ann Bell.

In the meantime, if you haven’t had a chance to read some of the past reviews and articles, you’ll find over two hundred options for a short read about books, writing, authors, classes, guest posts, interviews, promotions, and moi. I’ll be back.

2013 in review


I want all my followers, readers, and friends to know how much you have helped me during the last year. Below is a report of the success of this blog for 2013. And it only happened because of you!

 

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,500 times in 2013. If it were a cable car, it would take about 42 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Expected Doings in 2014


The storms of 2014 seem intent on making everyone, even those of us in the Deep South, miserable. It’s cold and dreary. But that hasn’t stopped me from going forward with my plans for further success this year. Book two of The Trey Fontaine Mysteries, ULTIMATE GAME, has gone to the editor and I’ll so be working on the first revision with her.

In the meantime, I’ve set my sights on the creation of one or two literary works, and have been daydreaming about plots and characters, and the wideness of the genre, or non-genre, as it were.

I’ve been plotting and planning my garden–I think you’ll find that all gardeners start dreaming of the next big harvest during the worst of winter weather. First I must inventory the jars of canned goods on the shelf, and determine what I shall attempt to grow this summer, and then comes the fun of seed catalogs, and plans for visiting the local nursery!

In the meantime, I’m on the search for a crit partner who loves literary novels and is willing to brainstorm and share his or her knowledge of promotion and publication. I know. This blog is disjointed and jumping from one subject to the next. But hey, that’s what the new year brings. An anxious knowledge that another year looms ahead, bright with promise and unknown joy.

I hope everyone takes these winter months to think on what the new year might bring. What new things might be experienced. And what you can do to bring a smile to others. I’ll be back with a list of books I plan to read, a couple of reviews of recent reads, some interviews and showcases of authors and their newest releases, a guest post or two, info on great classes and books for writers,  and updates on my hunt for a crit partner, my goal of creating a new pastermiece–I mean masterpiece, and a fun story here and there to make you smile.

Guest Post by Robert Stanek


I’m pleased today to welcome Robert Stanek as a guest on my blog. Robert Stanek is not only the talented author of more than 150 books for adults and children but someone who has been helping other writers ever since his first book was published in 1995.

Back in the early days of the Web, Robert created Writer’s Gallery, Internet Job Center and Internet Daily News to help other writers (archives at http://www.tvpress.com). These days Robert helps other writers by hosting some terrific writers groups, by blogging about writing-related topics, and through his Read Indie tweets on twitter.

On Facebook, Robert Stanek hosts one of the more popular groups for getting the word out about your promotions and free offerings. It’s called “Free Today” and you’ll find the group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/freet…. On Twitter, you can tweet using the hashtag #freetoday as another way to spread the word about your promotions and freebies.

Go Indie (https://www.facebook.com/groups/goindie/) is another terrific group for writers that Robert hosts on Facebook. Go Indie is a group dedicated to promoting indie authors, indie books, and indie booksellers. On Twitter, you can also use hashtag #goindie to spread the word about your books.

On Goodreads.com, Robert hosts the Read Indies group. Read Indies helps to provide a platform for writers to discuss their books and writing-related topics. Read Indies is at http://goodreads.com/group/show/88011.

Robert also writes the Read Indies Blog (http://readindies.blogspot.com/). The blog discusses many important writing-related issues and details many of the challenges indie authors face in gaining mainstream acceptance. Some of the more interesting posts:

Taking Your Work from Print to Film – http://readindies.blogspot.com/2012/1…

Selling Rights to Your Books – http://readindies.blogspot.com/2012/1…

Viewpoints on Rejection Letters – http://readindies.blogspot.com/2013/0…

Understanding Bestseller Lists – http://readindies.blogspot.com/2013/0…

Finding Success as a Writer – http://readindies.blogspot.com/2013/0…

You can learn more about Robert and his books at http://www.robert-stanek.com.

HOW NOT TO WRITE A NOVEL


I just read a post on Kristen Lamb’s blog ( http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/the-bookpocalypse-what-to-do-when-you-realize-your-story-might-be-dead/) entitled Bookpocalypse–What to Do When You Realize Your Story Might Be DEAD.

Kristen is so funny, and I love reading her articles. I always learn something from them. Can’t wait to get my  hands on her newest book Rise of the Machines–Human Authors in a Digital World. I recommend her books to all authors, especially newbies.

#Writer’s Conferences


This article is part of the Rolling Mystery Writers Blog Tour roll for Monday, August 8, 2011.  Today’s subject is Writer’s Conferences. This roll started with KT Wagner’s blog, followed by Mollie Cox Bryan’s blog. Thanks KT for getting us started and Mollie for introducing my blog. We hope that you will take the time today, or this week, to visit each blog on this roll. The list of participants follows my article.

And now, on to my thoughts on Writer’s Conferences

I’ve attended large conferences, and small ones. Both have their positive and negative qualities. Large conferences draw more big names, and have more of a variety of classes. But I found myself frazzled by the end of each day and when it was over I needed a few days to recoup.Though I went home with dozens of business cards, I didn’t really remember anyone, except James Patterson and I’m sure he didn’t remember me. The classes were great, but short and filled with others who had questions, so sometimes I didn’t get to speak.And I spent way too much money.

Then there are the small conferences. They may be a little shorter, have fewer participants and fewer classes, but they have something their big counterparts lack. Here’s a perfect example. A chapter of RWA in Shreveport call themselves the NOLA Stars. They meet once a month, have about twenty-five to thirty members at any one time, and sponsor a great little conference each March called Written In The Stars.

I’ve been an insider at this conference and know for a fact that everyone involved in the planning, teaching, sharing, etc., cares about every participant. We usually limit the participants to one-hundred. The conference starts with a finger-foods tete a tete Friday night. This is where the small conference shines. Editors, agents, and all levels of writers rub elbows, converse, tell jokes, and talk writing. I’ve actually stood talking with Jennifer Blake  as if we were old friends. I’ve gotten advice from multi-selling authors on my WIP. I’ve talked to agents and editors on a personal level.

There is also an awards luncheon where the Suzannah Contestants find out who won, and someone in the business does a little talk on what’s new in the industry, or how they made their start.

The next day is filled with panels of editors and agents who answer questions about their companies/agencies. Then classes start–only a couple, but excellent–usually by names like Jennifer Crusie, JoAnn Rock (a member of NOLA Stars), Debbie Macomber and Judith Ivory, and senior editors from major publishing houses. There are always special teachers who share their experience and knowledge, and enough time to cover a topic thoroughly and get questions answered.

Oh, and the prizes! A table full of books, tea pots, mugs, knick-knacks, do-hickies, and whatchamacallits, sit in the back of the room, waiting to be chosen by someone who has purchased a chance to win. A dollar could get you a great book on writing–or a basket full of a variety of books from different authors. I once won a basket filled with books, mugs, bookmarks, and choclate all from Christine Feehan. Great books. Huge mugs. Wonderful chocolate. Thank you Christine.

There are the individual pitch sessions, where you get five minutes to pitch your book to an editor or agent. And that five minutes it yours. Even if they are not interested in your book, you will learn tons by just getting in there and participating.

Saturday night is the big dinner when you get to sit by the agents, editors, writers, teachers, and all around giving people, who often drink a margarita or two, and enjoy a meal–we have to reserve a whole room at the restaurant for this event.

You can see where my heart lies on this subject. I had great experiences at large conferences, but for me, the less expensive and more personal small conference wins out every time. If you get a chance to attand a writer’s conference, I hope you take advantage of it. Large or small, which ever you choose to attend, it will be well worth it.

I hope this article has been helpful to you, and also that you will visit the other participants on this roll and see what they have to say about Writer’s Conferences. Next on the list is Sara Wisseman’s blog: http://www.sarahwisseman.blogspot.com/ Thanks for visiting.  Come back soon.

KT Wagner http://www.northernlightsgothic.com/blog
Mollie Bryan http://www.molliecoxbryan.com
Ryder Islington http://www.ryderislington.wordpress.com
Sarah Wisseman http://www.sarahwisseman.blogspot.com/
Kathleen Kaska http://www.kathleenkaskawritesblogspot.com